Madagascar

Nosy Be Sportive Lemur

Money collected so far

area

Lokobe National Park

Lokobe National Park is one of the few places in Madagascar where the original forest of Sambirano still exists. The forest of Lokobe is the only remaining original forest of the island of Nosy-Be. Its richness in biodiversity and the importance of its ecosystem both terrestrial and marine have earned this protected area to be considered among the national tentative list for the world heritage of humanity. It is among the 15 pilot protected areas submitted by Madagascar as a candidate in the IUCN green list process.

species

Nosy Be Sportive Lemur

Lepilemur tymerlachsoni is a nocturnal species endemic to the island of Nosy Be in the Lokobe region of northwest Madagascar. It is one of the three species of lemurs existing in the park and is classified as critically endangered (CR) on the red list of the IUCN. Its endemicity and its rarity makes it valuable in the eyes of scientists as well as the ecological roles it plays in its immediate environment. This species lives in primary and secondary tropical rainforests of the lowlands that are subject to a dry season each year. This species prefers tree holes for sleeping. However, it was determined in a recent study in Lokobe that they spend more time resting in tangles of vegetation in more open deciduous forests. They feed on leaves, supplemented by fruit and bark. Births occur from August to November, with mothers usually producing a single offspring. It is mostly threatened by habitat degradation and poaching.
Since the species inhabits the primary and secondary forests of Lokobe National Park where the forest foliage is lush and dense, and the hollowed out tree trunks provide them with obscure places to nest peacefully. Their need to remain hidden and out of harm’s way makes sport lemurs particularly vulnerable to any degree of forest degradation. For this reason, experiments were conducted by researchers to determine if the species could adapt to an artificial hole (wooden boxes with an opening at the top) for nesting and refuge in case tree holes were missed due to forest degradation. The results of this research allowed the park managers to consider the possibility of ex-situ conservation of the species if needed in the future. This study is a collaboration between the Lokobe Park and American researchers. In addition to the research, monitoring of this species as well as awareness raising were also carried out for its conservation.

Further protected areas

Madagascar

Hawksbill Turtle

Madagascar

Black-and-white Ruffed Lemur

Madagascar

Babakoto

Madagascar

Milne-Edwards’s Sifaka

Madagascar

Forest Rock-thrush

Madagascar

Mossy Leaf-tailed Gecko

Madagascar

Madagascar Fish-eagle

Madagascar

Nosy Be Sportive Lemur